I Am a Male Nurse

By NT Contributor on Fri, Aug 08, 2014

male nurseEver wondered what goes on inside the mind of a male nurse? Here’s a provocative glimpse from Jake S., one of our contributors:

Is it so unnatural for a beer guzzling, baseball fanatic, deer hunting, fast car loving, woman-chasing MAN to be in this profession?

I get asked a lot of questions about why I entered into the nursing profession. I understand all the misconceptions. Yes, I get asked about my sexual orientation, and if I didn’t know any better, I would think that I am a “victim” of sexism. Would anyone in their right mind outwardly ask a woman why she chose to be a …? (Enter any profession that comes to mind here.)  So why should anyone question a man for wanting to be a nurse?

I am finally ready to let you in on my reasons:

  1. I like the respect.

    I gave the Army four years. Then, I suffered, yet survived, nursing school with barely any sleep, any friends or any money.  I graduated. I passed the CA Nurse State Board. I gritted my teeth through the grind of clinicals. I did my time in the trenches as a new nurse grad. I have been an ICU nurse for the last thirteen years. I am about to take on the challenge of going back for my Masters. I am good at my job and I am proud of it.

  2. I am not a suit-and-tie kind of guy.

    I’m a lazy dresser. I am most comfortable in jeans and a pull over shirt. I hate shopping, and I hate the thought of wearing a tie every day. How uncomfortable is that? I like wearing nursing scrubs. I like not having to think about what I have to wear to work. I like the fact that it takes me five minutes to get dressed. Oh, and I wear comfortable shoes to work. 

  3. I like the hours.

    “Work hard, play hard” – this has always been my life’s motto. I don’t like banker’s hours or the typical 9 to 5. I like driving when there’s no one on the highway, when am scheduled the night shift, and I like getting up earlier than everyone else to start my day when I do work the day shift. I personally like working thirteen hour shifts. It gives me more time to do what I want to do when I am scheduled off. Three days on, four days off—hey, works for this guy!

  4. I like the money.

    Let me be honest, I know a lot of guys out there busting their behinds doing harder labor for less than what I get paid. I’m a hard worker and I’m a good nurse. I may even get a few people to say that I am a great nurse. I earn my paycheck working in ICU. When duty calls, I am there for my shifts. When I am needed to pick up a few more hours or another shift for a co-worker who is sick or has to take care of her kids, I am there. Do I get paid more for the overtime? Yes. Do I get paid for shift differentials? Yes. Is it worth it? Yes.

  5. I like feeling like a hero.

    My grandfather died of colon cancer in 1993. He was my hero. In his final months, it wasn’t his doctor who was there for him (no offense to my doctor friends), it was his nurse. It was she who was strong enough to see through the awkward and embarrassing moments, through the uncomfortable hours, through his excruciating pain. Through it all, she had a steely resolve to help him through it and to comfort him. He told me that SHE was his hero.

  6. I consider it my chosen “civic duty.”

    Ask any fire fighter, cop or soldier what makes them do what they do. There is one common denominator: to make a difference in someone’s life. It is to protect, to save, to help or to heal.  Being a nurse is no different.  

  7. Last but not least, I like my chances with the ladies:

    Sue me. I am in a profession that is 90% female. If someone needs help turning/lifting a patient, allow me. In my scrubs and outside of work, I am sometimes mistaken for a doctor. Let me tell you, I use it in my favor… sometimes. Brains and brawn can only get me so far. I also have my boyish smile, my caring nature, and a great profession with endless possibilities. I know I am a catch. Is it wrong to want to add my phone number here?

So, my reasons may not always be “honorable,” but I challenge anyone to contest my commitment to my profession. Men have a long way to go to gain the respect of ALL our female counterparts, the rest of the healthcare profession and the public in general. But as the old saying goes, “We’ve come a long way, baby!” - I’ll just hold off on the high fives and the butt slaps. 



152 COMMENTS

Michael Lee 2 months ago
39 years in nursing myself. When I get bored with a floor, I move on to another speciality. In two years I will be 60, and I want to pursue one more speciality--a little travel nursing. My wife and I experienced the Grand Canyon last year during our move here. I decided then I wanted to hike the canyon. To do so I would join a travel nursing company and work at the hospital in Tuba, Arizona. So, I hope whether its 13 weeks or 6-months I see parts of the Canyon others never experience.
I've had a great career with no layoffs, good pay, good benefits. Advice----always contribute to your retirement and always take your vacations!!!! It is a burnout field if you allow it.

Drew Totten, RN, BSN, BS, CLNC 3 months ago
Well written, sir. As a male nurse who has lived through the stereotypes and the "supposed to being female", I can relate. But it's all good. I've been helping people for over 30 years and don't regret a day.

Best to all...

Mark Macanas 4 months ago
I am an Asian Male Nurse who can relate very much on these article... I am currently working on my green card and hoping that I can get it sooner this year...

Dexter Saunders 5 months ago
Im currently on my second year pursuing a Bsc in Nursing in Trinidad and Tobago and reading this acticle really made me feel a little less weird, I have been a firefighter for the past 8 eight years, I have been an Emt for 5 of those years after studying Emergency care management I decided to further my studies in health and chose nursing because of my Emt background, with all he male stereotypes we have around the world its easier for women to get respect for pursuing a male dominated profession, than it is for a man to get respect for pursuing a female dominated profession, women get praised as strong independent women in a male dominated profession, while men are looked at as possible sissies or even gay a man's sexuality always comes into question with nursing ALWAYS !!! Im working and studying and my colleagues do know im studying to be an RN and in the beginning for about the first year, I had to deal with the nick name NURSY for quite some time, but after that passes they were more interested in learning from my external experience. I love the fact that there arent much guys in nursing makes it a bit easier to get employment because males are in short supply. Heard someone use the term MURSE and Male Nurse I dont really like when people add Sex and Gender to these professions I have female coworkers at my job now and I dont refer to them as Female Firefighters we are all Firefighters so when people ask me if im a Male nurse I so No im just a NURSE !!

Tony G. 4 months ago
Take it from someone who's been there, done that (I was a firefighter for 15 years in Toronto before I gave it up to do nursing full time). It's worth every minute of the experience. I have been a nurse for almost 12 years now (mostly in the ED), and have chosen to become a nurse leader. I am currently a director of 5 different units and could not be happier and feel so much fulfillment. So, hang in there and don't give up!

Khima Rudach 7 months ago
Dear All,
The world's first nursing school founded in India about 250 B.C. Only men were considered "pure" enough to become nurses.
History say that man or male have first become nurse.


Brad S 7 months ago
"Women are from Venus, Men are from Mars"...or however that saying goes. All I know is that on earth, nurses are nurses. However, having said that, I must say that being an RN (albeit, male, married, straight, and not into the connotations of 'sexy nurses' or 'gay nurses' - if you are gay, that doesn't mean you are a nurse, and if you are a nurse, it doesn't mean you are gay...you get it); my wife and I are actually both RNs and have awesome conversations. It's almost like it's the glue in our marriage, it keeps things interesting. AND she is there for me when I need to vent, which is often, because I am not great with patience, multitasking, or some of those other "female traits". I am a baseball-loving, work hard and play harder, hunting and fishing kind of dude. I also play drums if anyone is looking for a talented musician. And we digress...but seriously, the nursing profession needs to take more steps to make the field more male-friendly and advocate for equality. Dude, seriously, I have always felt like a minority in this field, and it does not stop to this day.
I can attest to the sexual discrimination that takes place in this field. I especially liked the comment referencing someone asking a female, "...and you became a ....(insert any profession) why?" I've been in and out of severe anxiety and depression since joining the nursing profession, and I even left the profession to graze on the "greener grass" of HR and sales for a couple of years, obtaining my MBA along the way. But here I am, back in nursing - I know, I know, I'm a glutton for punishment.
Nursing is not an easy field. It sucks, most of the time. RNs (male or female) wear so many hats, it's unreal. Docs are sometimes rude (but other times you want to just give them a hug for listening and not being an ass!); families and patients are unreasonable and narcissistic. We are taking orders and directing the care of so many patients we can't even remember their names, along with passing meds, cleaning up everything, taking calls from and re-faxing (for the fourth time) orders to pharmacy, and meanwhile the social service director interrupts the flow of things to let us know that Mrs. K is "thinking that she may want to die" and the RNs must chart every 15 minutes on her .... meanwhile, Mrs. K is smiling and laughing and throwing other nurses and CNAs under the bus, and the Admin DON comes down to talk about "treading lightly" with the psych patient because she complained. Really? Seriously, Ms. sit behind the desk and never come out to the floor? I need to "tread lightly" because a delusional patient who would light the place on fire given the opportunity complained about me? SERIOUSLY? Or is it (partly) because I am a male? (I think so!) I have an MBA, and you are not managing well...but...I don't say that, because I'm not the DON. ....

Anyways, nursing sucks sometimes, but it is a rush sometimes too. And now that I'm accepted to Nurse Practitioner school, I'm hoping the days of back-breaking, ludicrous expectations are down the river. And I'm up the river catching some fish in one of the 30 days of PTO I can actually take because I don't have to find my own replacement! YAY! I'm not saying this grass will be that much greener, but I know it will be a little more digestible and allow me to THINK sometimes! And I'm hoping that fellow NPs don't ask me, "Why, as a male, did you choose this profession?", and "You are getting an admission, and we had a call off, and the phone/TV/cable doesn't work, and Mr. K is suicidal and just threw a plant through a window, and you have another admission, she's here right now - get her weight and feed her and titrate her oxygen and ....ok, you get it! Oh, and the female nurses won't hopefully throw me under the bus anymore. AND for GOODNESS SAKES - NEGOTIATE your SALARY! Nurses deserve more! Don't take 25 bucks an hour when you can make 30 up the road with better benefits and more competent staff! Don't accept 22 an hour when you've been an RN for 10 years! Really? NEGOTIATE!
And that's all I have to say about that. --Forest Gump

xoxo!

Anonymous 10 months ago
I love that T-shirt girls get just after graduating nursing school. Goes something like this. "I'm a nurse. It's not what I do, It's who I am." As if they would do this for free? It's a job and no, I highly doubt any female nurse would do this job for $7.50 an hour, not for long anyway. It's a job, a pretty good job none the less, but a job. I love it. I too had another BS degree before nursing, in aeronautics but chose to go into this career for the stability of the job. I had SO many nurse instructors tell all of us in college that if we were getting into this job for the money, we should leave now. What a total bunch of miscreeds if I've ever! Like they would be doing it for $7.50 an hour either! No, I'm not gay. Yes, I have been sexually discriminated against, in school and at work. Yes, we are expected to do more heavy lifting than our female counterparts and yes, you probably will get passed by for promotion by a lesser qualified female. But it has it's perks as well. I leave my job at the door. I love working 3 days a week. I can schedule my days so I work 6 on and 8 off every two weeks. Plus you can work almost anywhere and don't forget traveling. Mold this job to your life and you will love it. It's not who you are, it's what you do that counts. JS, RN,BSN.

Ric Elizondo 1 year ago
I've been a nurse for over 6 years and I love it

Magnus Astrén 1 year ago
Thansk for your input! Two years ago I left a well paid job in IT Management for nursing and next summer I will graduate. I really feel like coming home - this is my backyard. I'm from Sweden and yes nurses are still predominantly women but at the univeristy 20-25% are men studying to become nurses.

Anonymous 1 year ago
Two more semesters of school until I too will be a male nurse. a murse if you will. probably about 12-15% in my cohort are fellas. we're adding to the ranks every day, jake!

Anonymous 2 years ago
You're totally right Jake. I would also like to add that another reason is that nursing has so many career options and specialties from being a nurse practitioner who can prescribe medication, pediatrics to cardiac specialty. The possibilities in nursing are endless.

Anonymous 2 years ago


I just registered for this website after reading this article. I love it. I am in nursing school right now, and one of my best buds is a male in the program. I sent this article right over to him. Well Done Sir



Anonymous 2 years ago


I just registered for this website after reading this article. I love it. I am in nursing school right now, and one of my best buds is a male in the program. I sent this article right over to him. Well Done Sir



Anonymous 3 years ago
I love reading your articles! good on you Jake your article is very encouraging to all nurses.

Anonymous 3 years ago
I can never say that male nurses are better than female nurses... Same team; as is all your health care professionals. The truth is, with hundreds of career paths with just an RN, I can change my job every 2-3 years with no problem. I have job ADD and could never see myself working five days a week nine to five, behind a desk or on an assembly line. I dislike doing the same thing every day and nursing tests not only my intellectual side but also my personable side. I save lives, and that life could be yours. I agree with the above, more male nurses are needed. Don't listen to stereotypes, Break the mold. Men have a lot to offer in the nursing field. Enjoy this truly rewarding job.

Anonymous 3 years ago
I am a nurse, male! I agree with all the other comments above. Iam very proud to be a nurse. There really is not another career i could ever see myself doing!
I can safely say that when i get home, i know ive achieved and done something right for the day. I feel absoutely privilled to be able to help and provide excellent care towards my patients wach day..its the patients for me that makes me wanna go into work each time.
Ive been qualified for a year and a half and i was 1 of 5 makes in my cohort at university!! But i can foresee that the future of nursing will become 50/50!!

Anonymous 3 years ago
Thanks everyone for their great encouragements on becoming a male RN. I have a quick question for the experienced RN's, I am a male hispanic born and raised in California, Is there more advantages as far as employment? I speak Spanish and English. JW, Thanks!

Laurel Harper 3 weeks ago
No, there's no real employment advantage to being bilingual because we have certified interpretors, however, it makes the job easier when you don't require one.

Anonymous 3 years ago
proud to be a male nurse

Anonymous 3 years ago
I go to college now but I am thinking of applying to the nursing program at my university. I am still worried about doing it because of what females might think of me. I can't decide because of this! My studies right now are very boring and I've had very positive experiences in hospitals and with nurses. I am thinking of nursing because I want a job where I know I'm making a difference in someone's lives. I was so encouraged but not only the amount of males but females who commented in these posts. From a male student who is thinking of doing nursing but afraid of what females might think, I can not say how much these encouraging posts mean from female nurses!

Laurel Harper 3 weeks ago
If you go into nursing, you do it for yourself, not because of what females might think of you. Don't make career decisions based on that. I've never heard the terms "female accountant" or "male teacher" and so on. "Nurse" is a profession, not a gender. I suggest we all refrain from using the phrase "male nurse" and use simply "nurse." It's been proven that women aren't the only ones who go into nursing, so that makes this an evidence-based suggestion. 21st century and all.

Anonymous 3 years ago
I was really in a great confusion of taking my carrer as a male nurse but reading your article i m happy and wanna choose this carrer thanks to all

Anonymous 3 years ago
I was thinking about being a male nurse but I always wasn't sure, but after reading this article I am sure about what I want pursue in life.

Thanks.

Anonymous 3 years ago
I have been a MALE NURSE for 30 years! Before that I was just a male....Go Bro!

Anonymous 4 years ago
Great article...

Anonymous 4 years ago
as a former nurse recruiter I can tell you that most of my clients preferred working with male nurses to female nurses. No offense to the ladies, but male nurses offer less drama.

Anonymous 4 years ago
Love it!

Anonymous 4 years ago

Male nurse also 30 years icu/ER. loving the article you wrote


Anonymous 4 years ago

Hey I'm a junior in highschool and my mom is a nurse, my older sister is in school now to be a nurse also, I have always wanted to do something in the medical field but we don't have enough money for me to go to school to be a doctor...my mom suggested nursing to me but I didn't want to do it because of all the stereotypes for male nurses but after reading this article and all of your comments I know that I do want to be a nurse, thank you everyone.


Anonymous 4 years ago

12/20/10 I am a R.N. and my grandmother was a R.N. she has sinced passed away and when we cleaned out her house I found an L.P.N. pin? I asked my mom about it and found out my grandfather was an L.P.N. he died of a massive MI in the early 60's! I was shocked and would love to know the history of how many there were at that time? was he one of the 1st classes of male nurse's? what a legacy, that I know nothing about anybody have any ideas where I might start to find information to find out when he graduated? please email karenaustin67@yahoo.com


Anonymous 4 years ago

i am also a male nursing student . i am very excited to read this artical and it gave me the umph i needed to get over the hump. if i can deal with the women . i have no filter between my brain and my mouth .


Anonymous 4 years ago

As a male nursing student, this article was exactly what I needed to read to solidify that I am making the exact right choice for myself. Thanks!


Anonymous 4 years ago

Jake, if I ever get into remission from the sicknesses that took me from the bedside nursing I loved & dearly miss, I would be honored to work with you. Thanks for writing your story. I'm an old RN, married 37 years, & I hope someday you find a special person who will be your lifelong companion, just as I have. Enjoy the ride until you do. I have worked with guys of both sexual orientations, & there is one thing they have in common - a commitment to teamwork & a dislike of "tattling" behaviors that replace problem solving. I think that stuff has gotten worse with the shortage & cutbacks in staffing with the recession. We need more guys in nursing. I am sick & tired of people assuming guys who opt to nurse are somehow weird. Your article shows there's nothing weird or unhealthy about guys choosing nursing. I have gotten enough, "You're smart, why are you JUST A NURSE?" comments muself to make me want to scream; I once said, after "I love being a nurse" didn't work: "Because SOMEONE has to keep the doctors from killing off the patients! You all get too tired & next thing you know, the orders get weird & we end up arguing, with the pharmacist telling you I'm right, or you chicken-scratch something that no one can decipher & you get ticked if we call you, but you resist computerized order entry that would always be legible." It hushed them up! Carry on, Jake. I read this to my son, whom I believe would be a fantastic nurse, although since he, like me, was a caregiver from a young age & my husband & I are both disabled, he's probably sick of it! But I still think one day, he'll go for it, I think it's just in the blood.


Anonymous 4 years ago

My mom is a female doctor and my sister is a female lawyer. My aunt is a female business man. I'm glad we're identifying genders.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I've been a male RN for 19 years. I got interested in the field when I was a Navy Corpsman. I worked with a lot of great male nurses in the USN, and they inspired me to also become a RN. I'm glad to see more men come into the profession.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Great story Jake.;very similar to my own and the reason my son follows in our footsteps. The only thing i do differently is tell people not to insult me when they mistake me for a doctor. I am proud of what I do and want them to know it.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Yup, I'm a male nurse. Is there stereotyping... Yes... Is it usually easy to laugh at?... Sometimes... Do I feel like a hero?.. Not really... Do I feel sore and under-appreciated?... Yes... In summary, don't go into this for economic reasons... You could work 80 hours a week and still come out better than feeling sore, under-appreciated, and pigeon-holed... Do I love what I do?... Mostly depends on the day... Do I think I can score with the ladies?... Yeah right. Do this is and your *ss is grass... Remember females tend to congregate... Tried to be honest... Sorry if I offended any well-wisher types...


Anonymous 4 years ago

Great job on the article. I see a lot of you in me. Though I think i have you beat. I have been an RN for 21 yrs, with the last 16 of those years as a Labor and Delivery nurse. Talk about sexism! I am very good at what I do. Patients, who you would think would have the most objection, love me. It's the nurse who have the problem! Overtime though they come around. But still, working with a bunch of women is an adventure. I often tease them that its like having 8 wives at home all at once. Patients ask how do I work with all that estrogen? Again, great article, wish they had asked me to write one. I have a book!


Anonymous 4 years ago

Thanks for the great article! And thank you so much for not calling me a "Murse"- I cannot deal with that one. I've been a nurse for 19 years and a male for 45 years- I expect to stay both until the end. I work in community based nursing and find even fewer guys here than in any other setting I've been in. Generally, especially as I've gotten more years under my belt, the ladies treat me fine. I would like to add that I make it a special passion to recruit men into nursing. I never pass up the chance to talk to teenage guys. And I am not beyond pointing out that, if they are straight, they get to work with lots of ladies, and if they are gay, where better to find the cutest, nicest, gay guys? So far I know of seven men who got into nursing because of my direct efforts. (I wonder if it is worth noting that myself, I'm straight, and got into nursing after trying to make a better life and living that as an English major.)


Anonymous 4 years ago

Love male nurses, Been an RN for fourty years and supervisor for the last twenty years. Worked with male nurses on the ambulance, Med Surg, Emerg. Rooms, Psy Hospitals and Prison Py UNits. I have found them to be hard working, knowlegable, dependable, less complaining, and less call ins Give me a "male nurse" anyday.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I am a nurse and I met my boyfriend, an RN, on a travel nursing assignment 2 & 1/2 years ago. Not only is he a nurse, but a NICU RN at that! Talk about sexy....WOW!!! He is AMAZING at what he does & I am a very lucky woman! You knew what you were doing when you became a nurse!


Anonymous 4 years ago

Hear, Hear. Jake! I've been in nursing now for 35 years. I love it. I'm coming eligible for retirement but not sure I'm ready. I'm like you Jake. Spent my time earlier in my career as a Army medic. MOS 91B then 91C. I liked nursing so much I continued my schooling to be a RN. I've worked in just about every nursing setting you can think of. Right now oncology. I still love it. If I do retire like my wife wants, I'll probably still do it at least part time.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Good for you. I have been a nurse for 19 years and a travel nurse fir the last four and 1/2 years. I have worked with many great male nurses.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I agree with Jake that there are perks to being an RN. I guess the perks outweigh the downside or I would not still be in this profession. I have to stay in (the profession) at least until my kids are out of college. I work for the UC system in California, and am very unhappy. At this hospital it's just as bad for men as it is for women. I'm lucky if I ever get offered a 15 minute break during my 12 hour shift. Just recently the hospital where I work, UCDMC (due to bad publicity...we voted to strike) has been making an effort to a least get us relief so our patients are looked after while they give us a 30 minute (in 12 hours)lunch.In reality,it's usually the charge nurse holding your beeper for 30. Nothing ever gets done for your patients while you're gone. No sanctioned breaks, just a 30 minute lunch. Once in a great while we get 45 minutes. In addition, they expect us to do online mandatory education modules during work time. We don't get paid for doing them. We have no time for breaks but they expect us to do continuing education online...for free, on our own time. If you don't do the modules you are written up or fired. Recently. the first module I opened up online was 42 pages of text plus a test. When do nurses have time to read 42 pages of text and complete a test while taking care of 4 patients on a telemetry floor? I would'nt recommend anyone go into nursing until hospitals start taking care of their nurses. And the patients suffer too. Nurses are well paid slaves with a flexible schedule.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I have been a nurse for 20 years and have seen more men enter the nursing profession, especially the last 5 years. I think that men at times do get judged for their sexual orientation, which is wrong. I work with male nurses that are top notch and are proud to be associated with these professional nurses. Great article Jake, I feel you expressed the thoughts,feelings and frustration of many male nurses. We need more male nurses in our profession.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I could not have said any better. I have been a RN for 31 years & things are winding down for me, but I have felt & dealt with many of same highs & lows & predudices you have. God bless & press on.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Oh, the many things we often don't think about. I have worked with many male nurses and the thought of them being a male that was a nurse never crossed my mind. HHmmmm! Anyway, I am glad we have male nurses. I love to see male nurses in the ER, ICU's, and OR's. Now I may get the finger pointed at me for this, but I love the strength of male nurses, not only that, but male nurses seem to have an intelligent strength. In the above named areas, male nurses seem to excel, and it is honoring to me. I love male nurses. I have tried to get any one of my three sons to become a nurse as I am, none of them have accepted. I love your story, although I am a female, most of your story could very well be my story.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I have been a nurse for 30 years. I embrace any individual who treats nursing as a profession and dresses the part at work. I would suggest you put on your man pants every work day, show up on time, wear your uniform with pride and not worry so much about what others might think about your sexual orientation. If you are secure as a man, this should be easy. Women have their issues in the work place as well. Just be your best and the rest will fall into place.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Right on Jake, we can help them, protect them,and be good to them, I love being a male RN, been one for 20 yrs, it's the best. Sexist, you bet!


Anonymous 4 years ago

As an African American male who entered nursing in 1969, I was glad to read the article "I am a male nurse." I can tell you that it is a lot easier now than when I entered in 1969. Not only did I have to deal with racism but sexism as well. However I would be the frist to say if I had to do it all over again I would not have any reservations about becoming a nurse. I am thankful to all the female nurses who supported me and welcome me into their profession. Sincerely, 63 and still working as a nurse


Anonymous 4 years ago

Jake: I would rather work with male nurses on any day, for the end of time. Men who do not feel they have to dominate females, that is, are the best to work with becaue youdon't take things so personal. I can "kibitz" with a guy on an issue, an ee f we disagree, there is no brooding or avoidance or lack of eye contact for a wek. Men don't gossip in frontof you, anyway. Men are analytical, collaberative, and can laugh and have fun. Sure, some women fit this description, but more consistently, men do. I would love for nursing t become more populated with gret guys. You go ahead and hunt, and drink beer (please don't flirt too much at work), and strut....sign-up and come over to a great profession for men. We need the balance. Sally S.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Thanks for your candor and for just being who you are! Most of us have a "struggle story", including myself. I love what I do in my specialty, but see new grads being given the position I wanted, and now I am supposed to educate them. I see male RN's the same as female RN's- except maybe easier to work with sometimes due to less drama (as above). You rock, brother! Keep making it work for you!


Anonymous 4 years ago

I have been a nurse for 40 years and met my husband when he was an OR tech going to nursing school. He has been a nurse for 31 years. He remained in the OR and I have done everything else but mostly ED. I have always worked with males in nursing and find them to be the same as females- some great, some not so great. Get that Masters and continue to do the work you love. Nursing has been very good to us especially when raising our kids. Flexible hours, part time jobs with benefits and sometimes onsite day care have made nursing very family friendly. I've never regretted my career choice.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I too am a nurse, does it matter what genitalia I have? I look at my buddies, mostly 6-5 blue collar workers and I work three days a week. I go skiing on tuesday when I get a private lesson because nobody is there. I love my work, most all of my fellow nurses of both sex's like and respect me. I am the first one to defend my fellow nurses and they all know that. I am also the first one to teach if need be, and the first one to ask the oldest, @itchiest nurse one the unit for advice. I love being a nurse, my only question, why would you go to work and do something you hate?


Anonymous 4 years ago

Have ALWAYS appreciated the male nurses with whom I was priviledged to work. We were a team, and with their muscles, wit, charm, and knowledge, we did our shifts together! Nursing, like teaching, I feel is a calling and you have to really want to be one. I did, and was never sorry! My son (a Flight Paramedic) said "Mom, it was obvious you loved your patients and co-workers, and they felt the same about you". We are there to help our patients, AND each other. Kind of like family. We care for & about our patients, their families, AND each other! Thank you for being "who" you are, and may the lucky lady who gets your heart, know she has someone special! God bless you & all like you!


Anonymous 4 years ago

Sounds good and kudos for you. Wait until youve been the profession for 40 years and try to get married, stay married and raise children. As for me, Nursing has literally sucked the life right out of me.........but I continue, theres nothing else Id rather do than Nursing.....


Anonymous 4 years ago

Bravo to you Jake!!!! I've been a nurse for over 30yrs--traveled all over the country--ICU/ER/Child psych. Just like any human there are good and bad in every profession--regardless of sex/color/beliefs.I love working with all kinds of nurses! We learn from each other,support one another. Who else would understand how it feels to lose a child in a trauma alert? Or the joy of seeing a stroke reversed with thrombolytics? I'm proud to be a nurse and proud you are one too.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I loved Jake's article. We need people who can laugh at themselves in this field. I've worked ER for 28 years and have seen male nurses increase in number in the profession. Yes, women can be catty, but I've worked with just as many "catty" males. I've worked with female nurses who have schmoozed with the male docs just as much as the male nurses do. It's who you are, what integrity you have,and are you willing to work for the pay. I've seen both sexes in it for the wrong reasons and it shows. However, politics does rear its ugly head and I have seen preferential treatment given to males. All of the female charge nurses in my last ER were replaced by males, and one had only been out of nursing school for a year! So Jake, glad you're in the field we need more like you, and we need equitable treatment for all.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I am a Director of Nursing who has had the privilege of working with corpsmen who are pursuing nursing degrees and I currently work with an outstanding nurse who happens to be a man. I was a truckdriver before I became a nurse, so I know exactly what it is to be a "novelty". There is no need for sexism in nursing, there is no rule for why we become nurses. I love the writer's attitude!!


Anonymous 4 years ago

I worked for 27 years as a nurse in all the units of my small town hospital for the very same reasons you stated except the last one. We had many male nurses one even worked OB. They were dedicated and hardworking and a pleasure to work with.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Men in nursing, just like any profession add balance to the workplace, decision making process and protocol development. This is the same in advanced practice, education, research and administration.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Love your attitude! In 20 years as an RN I've had great experiences with male nurses - I think they provide balance to a unit. I hope the profession can continue to attract more men. Good luck with your graduate program.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I know many male nurses and love working with them. It is oh so sweet to escape the ocean of estrogen and do my job without all the drama. A good number of female nurses are not drama divas and it makes for a very comfortable working environment. But back to my point. Male nurses have a lot more to offer than most folks realize. Their unique perspective on the approach has been a terrific learning experience for me. I met a man from Kentucky who is a farmer by day and a nurse by night. Loves being a husband,dad, farmer and nurse. Very good at all 4 jobs and proud of it. Keep it up Jake. Sounds like you are having the time of your life. That is the way it should be.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I'm a male nurse, I've never been so disrespected in my life. It is a women's world when a man enters their world they think less of you. Any suggestions I've made to make life easier at work has been taking as "you are such a man you want everything easy". Women love and thrive in conflict and drama, as an easy going guy I've never fit in their dramatic and complicated work ethics.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Good hearing from an xy nurse. This profession has room in it for just about anyone who isn't afraid of hard work. And commitment. BTW, I'm an xx nurse and I ask xx and xy nurses why they went into nursing. I just like to hear their stories--not a gender biased question necessarily. Love our profession and the very special people who work in it!


Anonymous 4 years ago

i love being a nurse, too. i really don't see much difference r/t male v.s. female. i, too, have a great deal of attention from the opposite sex once they know i am a nurse. i, too ,derive great rewards from helping others. i love the money, too, although i can't possibly be getting paid enough for what i have to do, for being exposed to violent pt's, ones with deadly infections, families with unrealistic expectations, etc...


Anonymous 4 years ago

I love working with male nurses. I have been in (LTAC) Long Term Acute Care for about a year. Before I was a mother/baby nurse and never worked with male nurses. Now I work with them very often. My lead nurse is male and he is awesome. Our clinical manager is a male. I wish I could meet a male nurse who is interested in a older chick (smile). The president of my nursing class was a male. Hello Sydney. Anyway go male nurses I welcome you guys with open arms.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I was an ICU and home health nuse for 28 yrs and retired early because of lateral violence. It was often a pleasure to work with male nurses. In the beginning, however, I was being supervised by a male nurse who was just out out of nusing school himself and he was mean and full of himself. Other male nurses I met were promoted rapidly. I hope this practice is gone now.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Great article! Loved it. I have the great pleasure of working with several male nurses and they are wonderful. They certainly keep things entertaining!


Anonymous 4 years ago

It sounds strange saying I am a man, but a man I am, said Sam. What I am not is a mail nurse, I do just about anything else but deliver the mail. Not many nurses that have commented have made it a point to say whether they are a RN or LPN. this is a good thing. At the nursing home I work at we are nurses whether an RN or LPN, we work side by side taking care of business. However, I think it is a bit harder for a male LPN than a male RN. And about Darlene D who comments that... " men can't take the hard work." Thats a good example of the back stabbing cattiness that drags the profession down.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I am so happy more men are choosing this profession....and I didn't catch your phone number....


Anonymous 4 years ago

I've alway liked men being in the profession; generally they're exceptional. They've had to be confident,crashing a predominantly female profesion. I appreciate a smart, industrious, caring, energetic, co-worker, of either sex, who can perform without a lot of drama........and so far (40 years) I've had to listen, witness and endure a lot more of that from women....ad nauseum.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Dear Jake, Bravo for you for being able to speak up about this profession and how you really feel. I love the honesty and the compassion that you obviously have for this job. I am proud to call you "one of us." Keep on keepin on my friend......Good luck to you in this field as well.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I also value male nurses, most of them don't last long...can't take the hard work.Otherwise Jake & I are the same as nurses, except for gender. I work hard, play hard, always available to help. I entered the profession for job security which helped through the times my husband was laid off. Now back in school & loving it. I love working in this profession. And for Elizabeth O. who has terrible female co-workers, I feel sorry for you. Yes, when women get together they bitch but we work well together & support each other.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Excellent letter, love your view of what we do. I, too, loved having men on the floor when I worked the floor. The possibilities are endless in this profession, and WHO doesn't like scrubs and comfy shoes. Thank you for being one of us. Male or female we are all in the same profession. RN for the past 20 years.


Anonymous 4 years ago

PS. I don't mind about being called a nurse either.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Been a nurse for 20+ years, never regretted a minute of it and have made a lot of good friends male and female.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Jake S:I skimmed your article and most of it is "fluff." The women like that, but you avoided politics and working conditions, maybe intentionally? My brother and I are nurses, and a clue to him is that he doesn't like "Dilbert." I do! So we approach life differently: he likes 'smelling roses', I like to get wet! My only advice: DON'T CALL YOURSELF A "MALE NURSE." You diminish yourself and the job. You don't refer to the majority this way--right?? Or the doctors?? YOU ARE A NURSE! Period! Thanks for putting yourself out there.


Anonymous 4 years ago

when will we realize that nursing is a role, not a gender? too much word association with breastfeeding...As to using the term "medic", did that writer learn nothing in nursing school? Nursing is a seperate profession, while interwoven with medicine.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Jake, Jake, Jake: Do you know why people don't talk about vacations in Pennsylvania..we don't want people to move here...now we are going to have millions of men entering Nursing and reducing our odds...and happiness with our career choice. Just kidding. Great article, and I agree with the men who have been nurses 25 years plus. Our motivation may be a little different..but where else can you add "life" to someone's years...than Nursing. By the way for you young guns..my son is entering college...yes to be a nurse. Something about apples and trees it seems.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I have been a nurse for qutie a long time. I entered the nursing profession when very few males were around. I am honored to be a nurse and to have been an AF nurse to serve my country proudly. The nursing profession is one that is very flexible with flexible working hours which allows me to enjoy my music profession as well. Being caring, compassionate, parental, & professional is not gender related. I have been blessed & taught well by those patients I have helped througout my career.


Anonymous 4 years ago

To start I have a confession to make.I was orginally enrolled in a social worker program in college. When it was suggested to me that social workers don't make a very good living. It was suggested to me to check out nursing. So I went by the nursing wing at the college and looked in the classroom. It was ALL women! I changed my major the next day...I've been an RN for 25yrs. When I started most men in the profession were...How do I put this...not very "manly"...I survived all the jokes and references to my sexual preferences for being a murse.I worked my way through nursing school as a bouncer and found myself doing the same job once I was in the ER. I welcomed seeing more and more males join the profession. I've specialized in ER but have worked ICU, BURN, Dialysis and just about everywhere but OB. I've traveled the country working as a traveler and now find myself using my experience in the new field of informatics. Nursing has brought many rewarding experiences over the years. But I never would have made it here without the women who were there to lead the way...


Anonymous 4 years ago

When I was working I never ever had a problem with males in my profession. As long as we are all there for the same reason isn't that what it is all about


Anonymous 4 years ago

I am a second-career male nurse; my wife is a second-career nurse. She does psychiatric, I do critical care. Both of us, separately, and before we were married, had life-changing events that resulted in a "calling" for each of us to do what we now enjoy to the hilt. Some of Jake's points resonate; we both consider this profession as our destiny, along with our marriage.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Hey Jake, I like your candor & your attitude. But a warning from an "old-timer". After many years of being asked to help lift, pull & tug by my female counterparts, I ripped an abdominal muscle pulling a heavy patient from a stretcher to a bed in '04 & broke 2 neck vertebra turning an obese patient (who suddenly jerked back) in '06. I'm still the big, strapping 6-4, 220 lb., athletic guy that the women turned to for the heavy-lifting. But, now at 53 & wiser, I went from 20+ years of bedside critical care nursing to working nationally doing education for a large medical device company. No more injuries trying to appease & impress the ladies!!!


Anonymous 4 years ago

There are a lot of great! nurses out there regardless of gender but I live in a small town and when I worked the ER, the male nurses spent a lot of time hanging at the coffeepot with the docs. If the other gendered nurses did that, we were being lazy!1 I did enjoy the article though, thought it was well written, and am hopeful that male nurses WILL be seen as an equal in ALL parts of nursing!


Anonymous 4 years ago

Am I the only person who thinks this man is a sexist, egotistical opportunist?


Anonymous 4 years ago

Liked the article and agree with all of it. I find the prejudice toward male nurses is absolutely present among some female co-workers. And in some cases it borders on reverse discrimination. However, all told, I have been an RN for 16 years and glad I have been. A salute goes out to all the guys that got into this profession.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I think it is awesome that you care so much about this profession. You are a great example for up and coming male nurses. Keep up the good/great work !!


Anonymous 4 years ago

It sounds like you are the poster boy for promoting male nurses into the nursing field. If the guys would actually follow your work ethics, then great. So many times I have seen guys given the higher paying better jobs and better working conditions at the same places other harder working nurses who had been at their job for decades longer with more experience, dedication and loyality. May I also add these nurses were deeply loved by the families and friends of the person they cared for who wondered why their favorite nurse didn't get the "position/more money/recognition. Strutting your stuff and doing the male thing I guess does definitely have its advantages. I have also seen men/boys given special attention/advantages when in nursing school leaving female students to fend for themselves to gain knowledge needed to meet requirements of nursing which is totally unfair. Sooooo, it takes more than a sexy smile, flexed muscles, toxic testerone to impress me. I am with tooting your own horns comments. I would rather see a nurse perform and judge for my self not read your opinion or your personal evaluation on how you preceive what you are. Some people are egotistic enough to actually think they are really great with just their presence. If a nurse is really that good you don't have to toot your own horn, others will do it for you.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Give me a man any day! Especially a male nurse type man. I'd rather work with male nurses any day than a bunch of chatty, estrogen raging women! LOL and I'm a woman nurse. Truly our men are such assets to the profession. I've never worked with male nurses that weren't professional in every aspect. Well wait, there was that ONE in Palm Springs.. thats another story. You guys who feel the need jump in, there is plenty of room for you, we need you and we want your strength, wits and professional attitudes. I've been in nursing for more than 30 years and have always enjoyed working with our wonderful male counterparts. Keep up with your efforts guys, its worth the time and in the long run, it pays great. Aside from the great pay is the wonderful feeling that you've made a difference in people's lives. There is no gender difference with that feeling. Great thread.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I have worked ER, ICU, home health, and Forensic Psychiatry (to name a few). I have never encountered a patient ("beligerent cracked out") or anything else that I could not handle! I have worked with "lazy" "uncaring" male nurses (just as there are lazy and uncaring female nurses). Now, "Medic" is a term that is associated with the Army. Medics do not have the same training and do nurses thus to call a Professional Nurse a Medic would be a misnomar! I am glad that more men are choosing nursing! I believe that there is a need for both genders. I just hope that when anyone chooses to be a Professional Nurse that the choice is due to a genuine calling. It isn't an easy job and it is not for the faint at heart. During my 30 plus years as an RN I have had many wonderful life changing experiences and I have had many occasions to help my patient and or the family to transition through their own life changing events!


Anonymous 4 years ago

I have been a nurse for 22 years and I have worked with some of the best male nurses around but before I was a nurse about 25 years ago when my oldest child was born premature the best nurse she had in the first threemonths of her life was a male nurse I will never forget his kindness and compassion. I would work with a male nurse anyday and hope to be a great coworker. I think it takes a true man to have the compassion to work as a nurse.


Anonymous 4 years ago

As a nurse of 30yrs experience in ICU and ER, I have always worked w/male nurses. More have entered the profession in the last 20 yrs. and I am glad to see it. The majority of them are "straight" just like the majority of female nurses are "straight." It is too bad that this context is placed on male nurses. I had a peer who was a hunter, and all of them liked beer (must be a "male" thing) but I like margaritas, so go figure. WE worked hard together and there wasn't the "pettiness" that you sometimes get w/females. I think having males in the profession has helped it and I'm glad you're part of it!


Anonymous 4 years ago

Jake, Great article. We have a few male nurses at our facility, they are respected and greatly appreciated. I encourage you to get your masters. Presently working on that myself. Thank you again for your insight.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Hi Jake I have been a RN for 18 years. Nursing is wide open. About the time I start to think about going back to the communications field something comes up and my nursing career is re-energized. Yes I am a RN and yes I am male. I am able to support a wife and two preteens. My wife works part time only because she wants to and not needs too. There are specialty areas of nursing that cater to men in general. I have been licenses for 18 years and the last twelve I have not been involved in direct patient care. I still do patient care but in a different way that can support those that are dedicated to the bedside. How did I meet my wife? She was an LPN I was the RN charge nurse. That was 13 years ago. She is now in charge :-) Keep the dream!!! You have only begun to scratch the surface of your career in this profession.


Anonymous 4 years ago

great job. I think people just need to be educated sometimes. My husband is a nurse and i admire the job that he does and his patients love and speak highly of him. Education is the key. Keep up the good job.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I have been a nurse for 16 years and have always enjoyed working with my male counterparts. I hate that nursing is viewed as a "female" profession. In an Emergency Room, male nurses are needed. There is times us "girls" cant handle a beligerant cracked out patient that wants to knock the crap out of us for trying to insert a catheter or IV. Jake and all other male nurses..You guys are needed, admired and valued by us girls. Thank you for all you do!!!


Anonymous 4 years ago

Jake, Congratulations on all of your endeavors and best of luck with Grad school. I am proud to say that I too am a male nurse for the past 19 years. I became a LVN in 1990 and then obtained an ADN, then a BSN and just recently a MSN. I am a FNP and respect, and tremendously like the profession. I feel the same way about suit and ties, so own a closet full of scrubs. My job has compensated me rather well financially allowing me to indulge in certain luxuries, so have also been mistaken for a physician. BUT am proud to correct them and inform them that I am a NURSE. Was I also a good catch….you bet I was, hence my beautiful and loving wife of 14 years. Have I been called a MURSE or been teased about my sexual orientation, yes but as long as my beautiful and loving wife isn’t the one questioning, it’s all good. To all you future male nurses; go for it and make your mommas proud!!!!


Anonymous 4 years ago

Great article. When I was working was always glad when we had a male nurse on shift. All the ones I worked with were great.


Anonymous 4 years ago

To Deepak--I do not agree that nurse should be changed to medic. Nurse holds a special significance and gives the profession dignity. When females enter a male dominated profession they have to put up with the same hurdles that guys do when they enter a female dominated profession. I personally loved reading Jakes article and found it funny . I find that male nurses are an asset to the profession and definitely bring alot to the profession. I love working with my male colleagues and would really love to see more males enter the profession.kudos to all my male colleagues. Wendy S


Anonymous 4 years ago

Hi Jake, So glad you stuck it out and that you enjoy your work. We need more men like you to join us in a very rewarding profession. I've been a nurse for over 30 years and wouldn't want to do anything else. Thanks for your article.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Bless you Jake. As an RN of 24 years, I must say that I think male nurses are much more compassionate than females and they are not into "back-stabbing" like the girls are. I had a cervical fusion done last year and all of my nurses were male. They were wonderful, helpful and very caring. The last female nurse I had after a surgical procedure told me that my pain couldn't be a 9 or 10, cause I didn't look like it!!! She was lucky that I was feeling as bad as I did feel, or I would have hurt her in more than one way. Isabelle


Anonymous 4 years ago

I've been in the profession for 33 years and understand just what he's talking about. Worked the odd shifts, holidays, extra weekends because I wasn't a mother. Still, I love the job, co-workers and everyday challenges. Thanks for the article


Anonymous 4 years ago

I have been a nurse for 33 years and my 24 year old son is now pursuing his RN license. After realizing that his first pursuit of a Business degree would probably obtain for him a 9-5 office job, he decided to change his focus for a career that would afford him variety, opportunity and a great income with which he could provide for his future family. Nursing was the solution. Though, I never encouraged him to follow in my footsteps, I am very proud to tell folks that my son will someday be an RN. THose who have watched him grow up, and now find out the career path he is choosing, say, "Oh, he will be a GREAT nurse!" I have to agree. Thanks for the honest article, Jake!


Anonymous 4 years ago

Another "thumbs up" to Jake from a male colleague with twenty-five years in the profession. There's definitely lots of room...and need...for guys in Nursing. What I've enjoyed most over the course of my career has been the diverse population I've had the privilege to care for. From ER Trauma victims, to pedi and adult home care patients, to traumatized adolescents...it's always been rewarding to know that I've made a positive difference in someone's life. Thanks for a great article, Jake. I especially liked your opening. If I hadn't become a Nurse way back when, I most definitely would have been either a professional bass fisherman or professional musician. <><


Anonymous 4 years ago

Very Good Bro, I enjoyed your article immensley (sp). I too am a male nurse and have been in the profession since 1981. I started out as an LPN and then got my ASN in 93. Currently I work as an O.R. RN and have a good number of male nurses in my department, our mix is about 70% women and 30% men. We all get along well and so far no sexist comments (we're too busy for that!). I've gone through my share of female and male managers and directors at my facility and I'm proud to say they were both equal in their good and not-so-good qualities. Like you I really enjoy the varied times to work that nursing offers and I really like being able to go to stores and do other things when the rest of the world is busy! Like the stereotype, I am gay, but not out to my co-workers, so no issue there. I find my job fun, exhilirating, very satisfying and highly encourage other men, gay or straight to consider it for their life's work.


Anonymous 4 years ago

It's a job. It's a good job. It's rewarding in so many ways and I think men can make the profession even better (and kinder to new nurses, male or female). Nursing has given me an entirely new understanding of who I am and how I can make life better for people who need me.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I think your article was great and truthful. Honestly, I became a nurse for some of the same reasons like I am not a suit kind of girl. I too like my tees and jeans. Yes, when I became a nurse I thought it sounded good epecially when asked by the opposite sex what I did as a living! But above all it is a civic duty in a way. I love being a nurse! I wish there were more male nurses because working with women all day sometmes is a bore. We can be hormonal and at times difficult to work with depending on that time of the month! I am glad your a good nurse and who cares if you toot your own horn like one person commented...sometimes you have to. Nurses don't get enough credit for what we do!! Good Luck!


Anonymous 4 years ago

Jake, I appreciate your sharing a males view of the nursing practice. Yes, we share as male nurses same characteristics of "caring" as female nurses in the profession. We possess characteristic abilities in being "humanitarians" also and what a better way to demonstrate that concept of caring than through nursing practice. But, there is a dark side to a male in the nursing profession. I have been active in the Nursing profession since I was 18 years old, as an orderly to my curent position, certified Family Nurse Practitioner for the past 28 years. It has not been an easy journey. This has been my experience in the NYC healthcare system.I, as a Black male nurse,recieved different level of support throught the years by nurses, other nurse practitioners and physicians,from tolerance to outright resentment. I love the nursing profession. So, I share this to say, not all male nurses experiences the same exaltation an reverence are experiencing in the nursing profession as you have experienced. In my oppinion, it has been and will continue to be sexism, racism and inequality, when a profession is dominated by female or males and cultural ethnicity.


Anonymous 4 years ago

It is great to have a little testosterone on the floor to even out all that estrogen. I love my male nurses who are mentally well adjusted. There is room for all in nursing we need to stop those trying to eat our young. I like my days off.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I like to work with male nurses, there seems to be less female nurse cattiness, when there is a mix of gender on the unit.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I was once asked why I decided to be a male nurse. My response was natural and even kind of surprised me when I said because it would have taken a sex change operation to be a female nurse. The word nurse is gender oriented to females. I am not a big fan of political correctness but maybe its long past time we call our profession something else. We are the grunts in healthcare provision, the workforce. Doctors are the management and we fill the orders. I love what I do and the profession but in my experience in nursing I have had more predudice and discrimination from old fashion nurses that make it known that they think I don't belong because of my gender. I need to add that they are a small minority but often aloud to be subtle in their attitude about this profession being a womans world.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I work with a male nurses. More males are choosing nursing as a profession. And for the same reasons. I am happy to hear it works well for you in all areas. Maggy


Anonymous 4 years ago

I have had both good and bad experiences with nurse of both genders. Any nurse who can actually do the job well has always been one I welcomed. It is nice to have a colleague who can actually lift on three. Believe it or not, both men and women have difficulty with this. Good luck on your Masters, and keep doing a great job!


Anonymous 4 years ago

When I was a young nurse (1960) we were called Angels of Mercy. then we got all those men. We called them He-angels. Glad to have you


Anonymous 4 years ago

Loved your perspective. It made me laugh. Male nurses are indeed great to have around to help with the 500 pounders!


Anonymous 4 years ago

Loved your article on male nurses. Your gender does not matter as much as your passion, intelligence, skills, and committment to nursing and caring. Don't let jealousy from discontented fellow workers keep you from being the happy, fulfilled person loving their life. Lead by example and make your workplace a better place. Congratulations on all your accomplishments.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I'm a 37 year old male starting my RN program this fall, switching careers from being a programmer. My wife is a BSN and she's my hero. I hope to be as good as she is. One of the things I love about nursing so much, is the diversity of fields you can go into. For instance in my current job I write software that handles Medicare data. Coupled with my analytical and critical thinking skills, my former career experience and education will only enhance my skills as an RN. I'm thinking Case Management, Quality, Informatics, etc. Thanks for the article Jake. I took BLS this weekend and so far I've only seen one other male in my class and was beginning to feel a little worried.


Anonymous 4 years ago

LOVE this article!!! LOVE my Male Nurse Friends...all you have to do is look beside you for a Loving and Caring Man*


Anonymous 4 years ago

Look back into the history of nursing...men played a pivotal role in the beginning...welcome to the profession from one who has been in all facets of it for the past 40 years !!!!


Anonymous 4 years ago

I just stumbled into this article... all I can say is AMEN! I'm in Texas and I get all the same questions... are you gay, couldn't make it as doc, etc... I stumbled around in the workforce for 20 years prior to jumping into nursing - started with my ADN and am presently completing my Master's in Nurse Education, IT, and Mgt... crazy huh?!?!?! I have found many patients love to have a male nurse in their health care team... especially if we have a sense of humor! Many comments already posted here are so true... I just wanted to throw in my two cents. Get that MASTERS DEGREE! BRAVO - never give up!


Anonymous 4 years ago

I'm a retired RN now after having been a bedside nurse for 30 years. Most of those years I was the only male on my unit. I loved what I did and my fellow nurses seemed to love having me there. I only felt an outsider a few times but I refused to let them make me unhappy; I loved my patients and they seemed to love me, too! My deepest respect for all of those of you who continue in our noble profession!


Anonymous 4 years ago

Great article. I have been in the medical field for 31 years and started off in the EMS where it was primarily male. I only went to nursing school in order to raise my kids since a divorce left me a single parent. I found that only down fall in this field is the back biting nurses who are unhappy with themselves or the ones who think they are superior. I love taking care of people and most appreciate it. I love working with men most of the tines and I am proud of the men who do their job as a nurse well and are proud of being a good nurse. God bless and Kudos to you!


Anonymous 4 years ago

I absolutely love this article! I have worked with male nurses and have been cared for by male nurses and I must say that there should be more males in nursing! My husband and his best friend were both in the I. T. fields (computers) and when Hurricane Katrina hit, there were just no jobs available. However, they both decided to go to nursing school. As a former LPN and now RN, I have seen many sides to nursing, and I must say we need all types of people, both male and female to meet the challenges of the dynamics of nursing. I love the reasons you stated for being a nurse. So many people say that being in nursing isn't "family friendly." My husband graduates in two semesters and we just had our fourth child, my diverse work schedule allows me to be with my family more than other jobs I have had in the past. Thank you for your article, I am hoping to see more men in nursing, I appreciate male nurses and commend you for doing a job that most men aren't "man enough" to do. Kudos!


Anonymous 4 years ago

Yadda, yadda, yadda, you're also very good at blowing your own trumpet...


Anonymous 4 years ago

I have the pleasure of working with a male midwife. He's an absolute pleasure to have as an associate. I'm one of those 90% who had males in her school 39+ years ago and it always been a pleasure to work with male nurses. Throught my career I have always had respect those great nurses that I have worked with and there are many male nurses.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Excellent article. I am a semi-retired female nurse. I have had just a few experiences working along side male nurses and I have to say just those few times have been better, more positive experiences than most all the times I've worked around female nurses. just sayin.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I had to do a flyer for the nursing program I attended about this very subject which was prompted by watching my brother struggle all the way through nursing school. He graduated and is now an RN working in a field he loves. He used to be an air condition/refrigeration professional. He is good with his hands and has a huge heart. I would love to see more men in nursing, this field that I have chosen has given me more pain than anyone could ever imagine not being a nurse, my heart hurts when I see a hurting patient, my feet hurt from countless hours of running to and fro making sure that my patients needs are met, my brain hurts from stuffing so much information in it that I swear if someone looked close that they would see med/surg running out my ears, is the pain worth it, oh yea! My target was construction workers in my flyer, I don't know if I touched any hearts to enter into this field, but I know that there are lots of men out there that could fit the profession. I love them. Hats off to them for their strength and courage and dedication.


Anonymous 4 years ago

My husband left his career as a pro athlete - seriously! - to get his RN. This article fits him well - he loves to be on his feet, thinking quickly, helping people & not wearing a suit! Not to mention... here in AZ he makes enough money for me to be able to stay home with our kids (and comfortably!) How many guys can really say that anymore?? He loves it, and I am so proud of him for going against the grain - it's so worth it. I think men are really missing out by letting their "prejudices" get in the way of pursuing a high-paying, growing career. (On a "sexist" note, he was recently told by a coworker that she wouldn't vote for him to be promoted to co-manager because he is a male and she just wants a female. Ummm... double standard? Imagine if a man said that outright to a woman... pretty sure he would get sued!)


Anonymous 4 years ago

Nice to hear from another male Nurse who got into the profession about the same time as I did. To all the young males who want to be a Nurse, go for it! You will never work harder in your life as you will for your patients, but the rewards are there. I have never found that being a nurse gave me a leg up with the ladies. If anything, hospital policy discourages people who work together from dating. Maybe Jake can help me with that one. What is discouraging is the sexism from female nurses, yes it is there. I had one woman tell me in Nursing School that I had no business being a nurse because it took a job away from a woman. All of the managers and supervisors in my department are women. A couple of men have tried over the last 10 years and have been fed to the wolves by the ladies. Make no mistake, we are making progress, but we have a long way to go. Good luck to all young NURSES, male and female. We will be counting on you.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Thats what Im talking about a confident man!! You GO BOY!!! Nursing ROCKS! : )


Anonymous 4 years ago

I am so glad that you are speaking out for the male nurse. I am a retired nurse of 42 years, and I have seen a lot of changes in this feild. The best that could have happen, was for men to gravitate to this field. They have been a great assess to the nursing profession. Keep up the good work.


Anonymous 4 years ago

great article!!!!


Anonymous 4 years ago

All I can say is I wish there were more like him, I'll bet all his co-workers love him, from the new grads to us grizzled old timers. You sound like a lot of fun to work with!!!


Anonymous 4 years ago

I Definitaly think that State Officials should change the name of nursing as a whole. I read a other article that stated the name should be changed to Medic, and I 100% agree to this.The name nurse has a stigma attached to it, that only females are in this profession, but lets act if the name was say MEDIC, when men hear a word like Medic, I think they would definitly want to do this. If anyone reads this, and has connections, education, or the power to bring this change please do. I am just a ordinary High School Student who really wants more men to enter this field, and in couple of years have equal amount of men and women in the field. I belive the name itself is the problem, and thats why young men my age would think that this field is for women only, and its not. This field I belive, is for anyone who is caring and loves to help people whether it be man or a women.The name should be changed to MEDIC so men and women would be pleased, and thats what nurses do, they are educatied MEDICAL professionals.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I think more male nurses can only strengthen the nursing profession. It feels detrimental to any profession to have it be only uni-sex and nursing is no exception. There are strengths and weaknesses to every person and each gender, together a more equal balance can be achieved. Thanks for your story and good luck in your masters!


Anonymous 4 years ago

True true true! I enjoyed reading your article and believe most of us, male or female, can relate to many of your reasons. My favorite, #2. I wholeheartedly empathize with the "not a shirt and tie kinda guy," what a nightmare! Reason #8 - not expected to shave! Advice: study hard and do as well as you can through the prerequisites and throughout your experience in nursing school; enjoy the learning experience and the atmosphere of the school in which you attend; apply to as many schools as possible (4 and 2 year programs) Brian M Senior Nursing Student SUNY Binghamton


Anonymous 4 years ago

Well put brother, I'm a male nurse too, a nurse aid a couple years before that, and I just graduated last month, I tottaly get everything u said.....the funnest part though is that when the woman gossip we can walk away and not be the "stuck up" person, lol:)


Anonymous 4 years ago

I'm a 27 year old male who left the music industry about 18 months ago and now work for and ENT office as a CMA. I couldn't be happier with my work and cant wait for nurse school to begin. I get phone calls from worried parents and now have the ability to help people and offer my community a true service. Working in medical is the best career move I've ever made and because of the mass amounts of women I work with I'm the envy of my single friends!


Anonymous 4 years ago

i am also a male, currently going for my nursing degree. i love it, i cannot wait to actually finish so i can get out in the field. i have been "nursing" before i even considered going to nursing school. i had an older handicapped brother and did a lot of stuff nurses dont even know how to do. i love helping people and its my passion. people always call me a "murse"-male nurse hahahah but i dont care, im going to get a fat pay check and i love doing it.


Anonymous 4 years ago

oh and I forgot to say that I resist calling myself a male nurse because , duh, Im bearded, deep voiced and have my repro eggs on the outside. Like its bloody obvious! So do I call a woman colleague a female nurse... silly isn't it? I am proud to be a nurse


Anonymous 4 years ago

i too am a nurse who is male and I identify with most of your comments I am curious that I felt more privileged than the woman nurses in tow waysboth good and not so good I did get an easier ride through the workload than others woman nurses There is lateral violence between colleagues, mostly from woman and I learnt a lot from woman. How to be gentle, smart, caring, to listen and many other genuine qualities At age 57 I see it as a great decision to become a nurse at the age of 17. well worth it though there are many unsocial hours and the pay is not good here in Australia


Anonymous 4 years ago

I'm a male nurse, and I smiled at most of your article. People think I'm a doctor often too. And, I'm the only male in our department and (trust me) it isnt easy due to the high estrogen levels of your coworkers. But meeting women is easy and you can feel like a lifesaver. Great hours, everyone asks you for advice on health/surgery issues, and when they think you're gay the girls flirt with you more. Only downside is that most female nurses backstab male counterparts due to years of becoming accustomed that the male will be promoted faster. Its changing, but they look at you as the enemy often. I have the most patient comment cards touting thanks, yet an 3x the amount of coworker complaints stating innocuous things like "he left a bandaid wrapper on the floor". Why many female nurses are not happy, I'll never understand. Its great pay, great hours, and you'd think we'd all be so cohesive by helping each other daily. I can tell you this: if you want a great career and can ignore other nurses comments, you'll really enjoy every aspect of this profession.


Anonymous 4 years ago

From a fellow nurse..... Well said!


Anonymous 4 years ago

I am so stunningly happy to have found this article!! I am a highschool junior hoping to be a nurse. I get alot of crap for it, as put above.' Now, y resolve is only strengthened.


Anonymous 4 years ago

I like your article. I have been a nurse for a long time and there weren't many men when I started but there are now and I've found them to be excellent nurses. I've never worked with a lazy male nurse or one that didn't treat his patients with dignity. Your personal reasons for becoming a nurse don't bother me.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Great writing job! I know what it's like. I was an OR Tech once. A field mostly dominated by women also. Very difficult to find work as a male. Went to more school to try and be a medical office assistant...same thing. I'm now in office admin, part time. Again, same story. Getting too old to do anything else now.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Glad to see another man in nursing! Im in nursing school right now, and grinding through the clinicals as well. I haven't had any sleep in the last year, but I keep telling myself it's going to be worth it one day. Thanks for the inspiration and thoughts of a male nurse with some experience behind him.


Anonymous 4 years ago

Jake, I prefer to be called your colleague, rather than your counterpart. You'll be respected as a nurse by your colleagues, the health care team and the public, because you're a nurse, not because you're a man. I love your confidence and passion for your career. Is that number still available...I've been looking for work in CA!


Anonymous 5 years ago

Kudos to you Jake! I wish there were more Male nurses in the work force. Isn't it funny thou how you meet the same challenges as a man in nursing as a female does as a cop, firefighter, or CEO of a business for that matter? Granted, nursing may be one of the few professions where we out number you, but interesting still. Good luck to on your masters and thank you for joining the 90%.


Sincerely Tina RN Orlando Fl